Title

MIAMI DOWNTOWN PEOPLE MOVER OPERATIONS: INITIAL SEGMENT VERSUS FULL SYSTEM

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2000

Subject Area

economics - operating costs, economics - capital costs, place - cbd, mode - bus, mode - rail

Keywords

Transportation facility operations, Rapid transit extensions, Performance, People movers, Passenger conveyors, Operating costs, Miami (Florida), Line extensions (Rail transit), Downtowns, Cost of operation, Cost effectiveness, City centers, Central business districts, Capital costs, Automated people movers

Abstract

The Miami, Detroit, and Jacksonville downtown people movers (DPMs) were implemented in the United States in 1986, 1987, and 1989, respectively. Because capital at that time was insufficient to build full systems, the most feasible initial segments were built. These segments were the first part of larger DPM networks planned for the downtown areas. In 1994, the Miami system was expanded, and the Jacksonville system is now being expanded. These extensions to the Miami and Jacksonville DPMs will complete the systems as originally planned. Compared with the initial segments, the full systems are expected to improve downtown circulation for both the users of the initial segments, and new riders of the expanded systems. The larger systems also are more cost-effective in construction and operation than the smaller systems (initial segments). The Miami DPM, known locally as the Metromover, is the first DPM in the United States. Its initial segment operated for 8 years (1986-1994), and the full system has operated since 1994. The operations of the initial and full systems are compared to assess the increased downtown circulation and cost-effectiveness with respect to capital and operating costs.