Title

INTERMODAL FERRY TERMINAL MASTER PLANS FOR WASHINGTON STATE FERRIES: PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1999

Subject Area

infrastructure - interchange/transfer, planning - safety/accidents, land use - planning, ridership - forecasting, ridership - forecasting, policy - environment, organisation - management, mode - ferry

Keywords

Washington State Ferries, Transfers, Tourists, Time, Terminals (Transportation), Strategies, Strategic planning, Scenarios, Safety measures, Safety, Public safety, Projections, Priorities, Over-water coverage, Objectives, Mode share, Modal split, Intermodal terminals, Goals, Forecasting, Ferry service, Environmental policy, Environmental planning, Environmental management, Depots (Transportation), Commuter service, Americans with Disabilities Act

Abstract

The Washington State Ferries (WSF) system has grown tremendously since its ferry terminals were constructed more than 40 years ago. Vehicle traffic is at capacity, and future plans must maximize intermodal transfers of passengers from transit to ferries. WSF has completed master plans addressing this issue at six ferry terminals. The master plans for Anacortes and Bainbridge Island are addressed, and each has unique conditions. Bainbridge is a commuter terminal, has the system's largest traffic volumes, and is planned for 218-car, 2,500-passenger vessels operating on 35-min average headways. Anacortes, a tourist-driven facility services one international and four domestic routes. Although physically the largest terminal, it is also the most remote and has the longest waits. The primary methodology for planning ferry terminals is to separate travel modes for safe and efficient travel and to minimize intermodal transfer time. Direct links are needed for passengers from public transit and rail systems to ferries. Each terminal accomplishes this with similar, but unique, site-adapted solutions. Each terminal is planned using data developed for the project. Compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act is analyzed using special programs. Passenger counts and growth curves are developed from WSF's systemwide planning and processed to predict future modal splits. Fast, efficient, safe ferry terminals must separate modes of travel. Passengers must be able to transfer between travel modes with minimal time. Over-water coverage and environmental regulations offer challenges unique to ferry terminals. For success, each ferry terminal master plan must address these issues.