Title

TRANSPORTATION CONDITIONS AND ACCESS TO SERVICES IN THE CONTEXT OF URBAN SPRAWL AND DEREGULATION. THE CASE OF DAR ES SALAAM

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2003

Subject Area

planning - surveys, land use - impacts, land use - planning, land use - urban sprawl, policy - social exclusion, organisation - regulation, place - urban, mode - mass transit, mode - subway/metro

Keywords

Urban sprawl, Urban planning, Urban development, Under developed countries, Travel behavior, Transportation planning, Transit, Town planning, Third world, Surveys, Social impacts, Social exclusion, Public transit, Poverty, Poor people, Mobility, Metropolitan area planning, Mass transit, Low income groups, Low income families, Local transit, Less developed countries, Developing countries, Deregulation, Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Community planning, City planning, Case studies, Access

Abstract

Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, which is one of the poorest countries in the world. In Dar es Salaam, major deficiencies in urban development and transportation systems are reinforcing patterns of social and urban segregation. This paper provides an overview of the urban sprawl affecting the city and the shift in public transportation towards a system dominated by small entrepreneurs. The results of secondary analysis of data on Dar es Salaam from the Human Resources Development Survey is presented in order to assess access conditions to urban facilities and daily mobility according to residential area. The data shows that there are numerous obstacles to the daily travel of the city's inhabitants, particularly the poor. These barriers heavily affect schedules, complicate access to services, limit the use of urban space and place considerable pressure on household budgets. As a result, the poorest individuals tend to retreat into their neighborhood and limit their trips outside the neighborhood to only the most essential activities. Transportation difficulties reduce the number of accessible jobs, impact health and education, prevent the development of social capital and contribute to the process of social exclusion. In Dar es Salaam, a number of factors combine to increase the impact of these issues, including a longstanding local disinterest in urban planning and economic deregulation of the passenger transportation system.

Comments

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