Title

MULTIMODAL APPROACHES TO LAND USE PLANNING

Authors

P J. Shinbein

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1997

Subject Area

planning - travel demand management, planning - travel demand management, land use - planning, land use - urban density, ridership - demand, organisation - management, place - urban, place - low density, mode - mass transit, mode - subway/metro

Keywords

Zoning, Urban transportation, Urban planning, Urban development, Trip reduction, Travel demand management, Transportation planning, Transportation demand management, Transit development plan, Transit, Trade off analysis, Town planning, TDM measures, Suburbs, Residential areas, Public transit, Portland (Oregon), Multimodal transportation systems, Multimodal transportation, Multimodal systems, Mixed use development, Metropolitan area planning, Mass transit, Local transit, Land use planning, Joint occupancy of buildings, Intracity transportation, High density, Development, Density, Comparison studies, Community planning, Communities, City planning, Case studies, Alternatives analysis

Abstract

This article considers the need to make alternative modes of transportation viable to residents of the suburbs. A more balanced approach to planning that includes transportation demand management (TDM) strategies and provision of alternative transportation modes is warranted. Benefits of compact, mixed-use land development includes the placement of employment and retail activities in closer proximity to living areas. This reduces automobile trips, decreases road congestion, and lowers the urban area vehicle miles of travel. Bus and rail transit service would be available providing viable transportation alternatives to shopping and employment activities in communities and areas. The safety, zoning, and density issues to consider in developing transit-based communities are addressed. The case of Fairview Village, a mixed-use development located in downtown Portland, Oregon that uses multipurpose zoning is presented. The article concludes that while mixed-use land development may not be a panacea to urban transportation problems, they do offer an alternative.