Title

USING ORDERED PROBIT MODELING TO STUDY THE EFFECT OF ATIS ON TRANSIT RIDERSHIP

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2001

Subject Area

planning - surveys, planning - signage/information, technology - passenger information, mode - mass transit, mode - subway/metro

Keywords

Traveler information and communication systems, Transit attributes, Transit, Surveys, Stated preferences, Ridership, Public transit, Probits, Probit models, Patronage (Transit ridership), Passenger information, Northern California, Metropolitan areas, Mass transit, Local transit, Customized surveys, Conurbations, California, ATIS, Advanced traveler information systems

Abstract

Transit information systems (TIS) are systems that provide their users with information on transit service such as routes, schedules, transfers, and fares. This study is an attempt to aid in the development of effective TIS and to assess their potential usefulness. A computer-aided telephone interview was conducted in two metropolitan areas in northern California. The survey included an innovative stated preference design to collect data that address the potential of advanced transit information systems (ATIS). The study's main objectives were to investigate whether advanced transit information would increase the acceptance of transit, and to determine the types and levels of information that are desired by commuters. The survey included a customized procedure that presented realistic choice sets, including the respondent's preferred information items and realistic travel times. The ordered probit modeling technique was used. The results indicated a promising potential of advanced transit information in increasing the acceptance of transit as a commute mode. It also showed that the frequency of service, number of transfers, seat availability, walking time to the transit stop, and fare information are among the significant information types that commuters desire. Commute time by transit, income, education, and whether the commuter is currently carpooling were among the factors that contributed to the likelihood of using transit given information was provided.

Comments

Transportation Research Part C Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0968090X