Title

PARKING DEMAND AND RESPONSIVENESS TO SUPPLY, PRICING AND LOCATION IN THE SYDNEY CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2001

Subject Area

ridership - mode choice, ridership - drivers, ridership - demand, policy - parking, economics - pricing, place - urban, place - cbd, mode - bus, mode - mass transit, mode - car

Keywords

Urban areas, Travel by mode, Travel behavior, Transit, Sydney (Australia), Supply, Public transit, Pricing, Parking places, Parking facilities, Parking demand, Parking areas, Mode choice, Modal choice, Mass transit, Logits, Logit models, Local transit, Downtowns, City centers, Choice of transportation, Central business districts, Car parks, Automobile drivers, Australia

Abstract

This paper examines the role of parking pricing and supply by time of day in determining whether to drive and park in the central business district (CBD) of Sydney, Australia. A stated preference survey of car drivers and public transit users was conducted at a number of parking locations, transit interchanges, and shopping centers during 1998. In the context of a current trip to the CBD, respondents were asked to consider 6 choices, including 3 parking locations in the CBD, park outside of the CBD with public transport connection to the CBD, switch to public transport, or forego that trip to the CBD. The 3 parking areas were defined by hours of operation, a tariff schedule, and access time to the final destination from the parking station. Data from the survey was then used to estimate a nested logit model of mode and parking choices, which was then used to simulate the impacts of supply pricing scenarios on CBD parking share. The change in CBD parking share attributable to supply by time of day is less than 3%, compared to 97% attributable to parking prices.

Comments

Transportation Research Part A Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09658564