Title

TWENTY YEARS OF THE BAY AREA RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM: LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1997

Subject Area

land use - impacts, land use - planning, ridership - forecasting, ridership - forecasting, place - low density

Keywords

Suburbs, Scenarios, San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit District, Regional planning, Real estate development, Projections, Major activity centers, Land use forecasting, Land use, Forecasting, Development, Activity centers

Abstract

This paper summarizes findings from an update of the original BART impact study, examining BART's influences on urban development patterns 20 years after services started. In general, these findings are similar to those of the original impact study. Over the past 20 years, land-use changes associated with BART have been largely localized, limited to downtown San Francisco and Oakland and a handful of suburban stations. Elsewhere, few land-use changes have occurred, either because of neighborhood opposition or a lackluster local real estate market. While BART appears to have helped bring about a more multi-centered regional settlement pattern, such as inducing mid-rise office development near the Walnut Creek and Concord stations, it has done little to stem the tide of freeway-oriented suburban employment growth over the past two decades.

Comments

Transportation Research Part A Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09658564