Title

RIDERSHIP AND COST ON THE LONG BEACH-LOS ANGELES BLUE LINE TRAIN

Authors

J E. Moore

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1993

Subject Area

mode - rail, mode - tram/light rail

Keywords

Ridership, Railroad transportation, Rail transportation, Patronage (Transit ridership), Passenger volume, Los Angeles (California), Light rail transit, Boarding

Abstract

The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 places a new policy emphais on rail transit. Los Angeles county is in the process of building a 300-mile, $78.2 billion rail transit system. The first component of the system, the Long Beach-Los Angeles Blue Line light rail train, has been in operation since July 15, 1990. Official ridership forecasts for the Blue Line are 35,000 boardings per weekday in 1991, and 54,700 boardings per weekday in the year 2000. Ridership counts by researchers at the University of Southern California provide estimates of 24,100 boardings on June 3, 1991, and an average of 26,557 daily boardings during Fall 1991. These figures imply that the total cost per Blue Line boarding is substantially higher than the average for light and heavy rail systems recently examined by the U.S. Department of Transportation Urban Mass Transit Administration. It is unlikely that Blue Line ridership will increase, because the most reliable predictors of rail transit ridership are not under policy control. If bus boardings are accounted for, the net result of the Los Angeles rail initiative has been a reduction in transit ridership.

Comments

Transportation Research Part A Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09658564