Title

TRANSIT RIDERSHIP, INCIDENT EFFECTS AND PUBLIC POLICY

Authors

E Ferguson

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1992

Subject Area

operations - traffic, infrastructure - stop, ridership - commuting, organisation - management, mode - mass transit

Keywords

Work stoppages, Transit riders, Transit management, Transit, Traffic mitigation, Time series analysis, Supply, Strikes, Ridership, Public transit, Public policy, Patronage (Transit ridership), Mitigation measures, Mitigation, Mass transit, Management, Local transit, Fuels, Fuel shortages

Abstract

Transit ridership and performance is significantly affected by incidents such as labor strikes, work stoppages and gasoline shortages. This paper discusses the behavioral implications of such phenomena, specifically with regard to modeling the effects of incidents on transit ridership using aggregate time-series data. The speed at which transit ridership recovers to preincident levels appears to be more directly a function of market competitiveness. Transit managers can respond to the threat of strikes through a variety of mitigation and adaptation techniques. These techniques and their long- and short-term effects on ridership are discussed in the context of the transit industry in the United States.

Comments

Transportation Research Part A Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09658564