Title

TRANSPORTATION NEEDS, LOCATION CHOICE, AND PERCEIVED ACCESSIBILITY FOR BUSINESSES

Authors

K Kawamura

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2004

Subject Area

operations - capacity, planning - surveys, land use - planning, policy - parking, place - cbd, mode - bus, mode - rail

Keywords

Transportation planning, Surveys, Site selection, Service industries, Rail transit, Placement (Location), Parking capacity, Parking, Location, Locating, Downtowns, Commuter service, City centers, Central business districts, Businesses, Accessibility

Abstract

Results from a survey of businesses were analyzed with both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques to investigate how the businesses used the transportation system and how access could affect site location decisions. Most of today's businesses rely heavily on automobiles for all facets of business activities. The only exception is the central business district, where rail transit is heavily used for employee commutes. In addition, more than 90% of the businesses enjoy at least a somewhat convenient level of overall access. The perceived level of overall access of a site is statistically correlated with the automobile access and parking but not with the transit access. Analyses indicate that the locational advantage of the sites that are situated close to transportation facilities is minimal. Based on the complex and changing nature of transportation needs uncovered by the survey and on market research, an approach is recommended for inclusion in the transportation planning process.