Title

AUTOMATED PEOPLE MOVER ON A UNIVERSITY CAMPUS: MOBILITY IMPACT ANALYSIS

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2004

Subject Area

ridership - mode choice

Keywords

Travel time, Ridership, PRT, Personal rapid transit, People movers, Patronage (Transit ridership), Passenger conveyors, Mode choice, Modal choice, Mobility, Methodology, Methodologies, Measures of effectiveness, Journey time, Choice of transportation, Campus transportation, Before and after studies, Automated people movers

Abstract

A system to transport people into and about closely spaced activity centers continues to be an unmet need in the U.S. transportation infrastructure. New automated people movers, particularly personal rapid transit (PRT) concepts, hold tremendous potential to solve many of the mobility issues surrounding activity centers. Even as these concepts move steadily toward initial deployment, analysis tools and methodologies are lacking to compare existing mobility practice objectively with predicted practice with one of these new systems in place. Existing simulation tools are primarily limited to a single mode of transportation. Traditional ridership forecasting is mainly based on socioeconomic factors so that captive ridership can be estimated. A methodology for comparing the before-and-after effects of a proposed new transit system is introduced. The network model is multimodal and incorporates vehicle, pedestrian, and transit networks and their interconnections (e.g., parking lots). Mode choice is determined simply from minimum travel time. The modeling concepts are described and applied to a midwestern university campus to evaluate the potential impact of a PRT system. Measures of system effectiveness are extracted from the model results, not just simple statistics of ridership for a particular mode of transport.