Title

HOW TO AVOID TECHNICAL INCONSISTENCY AND MAINTAIN CREDIBILITY

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1997

Subject Area

operations - traffic, planning - safety/accidents, infrastructure - maintainance

Keywords

Transportation engineers, Traffic operations, Traffic, Technology assessment, Technical analysis, Safety measures, Safety, Regulatory policy, Public safety, Policy, Policies, Mobility, Highway operations, Government policy, Decision making, Consistency, Accuracy

Abstract

The credibility of transportation engineers is essential to guide decisionmakers in making sound decisions about a constituency's mobility and safety. This article focuses on the area of technical inconsistency--why inconsistencies occur and what inconsistencies are the most common. The authors provide several examples of technical inconsistencies that have led transportation professionals to lose face and to have their recommendations questioned or ignored. The examples encompass a traffic impact study, traffic diversion, traffic safety, traffic calming, transit ridership estimates, and freeway improvements. The authors conclude with suggestions on how to avoid technical inconsistencies.