Title

FACTORS INFLUENCING LIGHT-RAIL STATION BOARDINGS IN THE UNITED STATES

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2004

Subject Area

operations - capacity, operations - traffic, infrastructure - station, land use - urban density, policy - parking, place - cbd, mode - bus, mode - rail, mode - tram/light rail

Keywords

United States, Temperature, Site selection, Ridership, Railroad stations, Population density, Placement (Location), Patronage (Transit ridership), Passenger traffic, Parking capacity, Parking, Multiple regression analysis, Location, Locating, Light rail transit, Land use, Employment, Downtowns, City centers, Central business districts, Bus lines, Accessibility

Abstract

This study uses multiple regression analysis to determine factors that contribute to high light-rail ridership. Cross-sectional data on average weekday boardings were collected for the year 2000 for 268 stations in nine U.S. cities representing a variety of urban settings. The results showed the importance of land use and accessibility. About eleven significant variables were found for explaining ridership, including employment, population, percent renters within walking distance, bus lines, park-and-ride spaces and centrality. Dummy variables for terminal and transfer stations and international borders were all positive and significant. Total degree-days were negative and significant, lowering expectations for cities with extreme climates. Notably, the stations in the central business district (CBD) generate much higher boardings, but these can be explained by the same variables present in lesser combinations at non-CBD stations and account for their generally lesser boardings. Importantly, a dummy variable for CBD location was not significant. The limitations of this model and directions for further research are discussed.

Comments

Transportation Research Part A Home Page: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/09658564