Title

Use of Spatiotemporal Constraints to Quantify Transit Accessibility Case Study of Potential Transit-Oriented Development in West Valley City, Utah

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

2014

Subject Area

place - north america, land use - transit oriented development, ridership - mode choice, infrastructure - stop, planning - route design

Keywords

Transit accessibility, mode choice, transit-oriented development (TOD)

Abstract

Accessibility emerges as the transportation performance measure that emphasizes the benefits to transportation system users and captures more than the speed of travel. Transit accessibility shows how easy it is for an individual to travel to a desired destination by using public transit. However, for transit to be considered as an option in mode choice at all, there has to be a feasible transit route leading from a given origin to a desirable destination within the available time frame. This study used spatial and temporal constraints and a set of transit features that affected access to transit to develop a conceptual framework for transit accessibility measurements in a potential transit-oriented development (TOD) location in West Valley City, Utah. As this network develops more transit-friendly features, temporal and spatial accessibility indicators will provide useful information on the opportunities that users can reach by using transit. The proposed methodology was based on traffic and transit data from the case study network and used an open source tool to perform transit accessibility measurements by calculating the number of accessible transit stops from each origin. The methodology considered network features, acceptable walking time, available time budget, transit schedule variability, and spatial constraints as impact factors in accessibility measurements. The goal of the study was to establish a feasible set of transit accessibility indicators that would be used for both the case study street network and transit service modifications to transform the network into a transit-friendly and eventually a TOD environment.

Rights

Permission to publish the abstract has been given by Transportation Research Board, Washington, copyright remains with them.